10 Tips for Raising Mentally Strong Kids

10 Tips for Raising Mentally Strong Kids

Mentally strong kids are prepared for the challenges of the world. They’re able to tackle problems, bounce back from failure, and cope with hardships. 

To be clear, mental strength isn't about acting tough or suppressing emotions. It's also not about being unkind or acting defiant.

Instead, mentally strong kids are resilient and they have the courage and confidence to reach their full potential.

Helping kids develop mental strength requires a three-pronged approach: teaching them to replace negative thoughts with more realistic thoughts, helping them learn to control their emotions so their emotions don’t control them, and showing them how to take positive action.

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Toddlers May Gain More From Paper Books Than E-Books: Study

Toddlers May Gain More From Paper Books Than E-Books: Study

Parents and toddlers talked more when reading print books, and were more apt to work together to perform tasks like holding the book and turning pages, Munzer and her colleagues found.
Toddlers presented with an e-book became more focused on the tasks of tapping or swiping the screen, instead of

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Why Disobedient Children Make Great Entrepreneurs

Why Disobedient Children Make Great Entrepreneurs

"It turns out there are plenty of benefits to a little bit of naughtiness or disobedience," writes Lauren Knight in her "On Parenting" column in The Washington Post this week. "Research shows that disobedient children earn more as adults and are also more likely to be entrepreneurs."

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Why it’s good to have a strong-willed child, and why you should let up on them

Why it’s good to have a strong-willed child, and why you should let up on them

Though there are plenty of times when parenting a strong-willed, sometimes disobedient child is a difficult, exhausting endeavor, it turns out there are plenty of benefits to a little bit of naughtiness or disobedience. Research shows that disobedient children earn more as adults and are also more likely to be entrepreneurs. As it turns out, some rather intelligent children who defy authority or challenge the status quo tend to think more outside the box, lending them a certain creative upper hand when it comes to new ideas and starting businesses. Entrepreneurs tend not to play by the rules.

Laura Markham, a clinical psychologist at Columbia University, explains that strong-willed children (those who are described as spirited, headstrong, rambunctious, and even courageous) are usually...

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Homework is wrecking our kids: The research is clear, let's ban elementary homework

Homework is wrecking our kids: The research is clear, let's ban elementary homework

Homework does have an impact on young students — but it’s not a good one
“There is no evidence that any amount of homework improves the academic performance of elementary students.”

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All Work and No Play: Why Your Kids Are More Anxious, Depressed

All Work and No Play: Why Your Kids Are More Anxious, Depressed

For more than fifty years, children's free play time has been continually declining, and it's keeping them from turning into confident adults.
What are your memories of playing as a child? Some of us will remember hide and seek, house, tag, and red rover red rover. Others may recall arguing about rules in kickball or stick ball or taking turns at jump rope, or creating imaginary worlds with our dolls, building forts, putting on plays, or dressing-up. From long summer days to a few precious after-school hours, kid-organized play may have filled much of your free time. But what about your children?

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How to talk to your children about tragedy

How to talk to your children about tragedy

Don't worry about saying the perfect thing- there is no answer that will make everything ok. It's alright to say you don't know. What children need most is someone to hear their concerns, accept their feelings, and be there for them. Answer their questions honestly, keep your responses simple and appropriate to their developmental level. Provide reassurance. Being silent or avoiding the issue won't protect them from what happened and may prevent them from understanding and learning how to cope with their feelings. Shutting down communication may leave your child with the impression that they can't or shouldn't come to you about the difficult things.

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The decline of play in preschoolers — and the rise in sensory issues

The decline of play in preschoolers — and the rise in sensory issues

My wake-up call was when the preschool teacher came up to me and said, “Your daughter is doing well academically. In fact, I’d say she exceeds expectations in these areas. But she is having trouble with basic social skills like sharing and taking turns.” Not only that, but my daughter was also having trouble controlling her emotions, developed anxiety and sensory issues, and had trouble simply playing by herself!

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Schools in England Introduce a New Subject: Mindfulness

Schools in England Introduce a New Subject: Mindfulness

“As a society, we are much more open about our mental health than ever before, but the modern world has brought new pressures for children,” Damian Hinds, the British education secretary, said in a statement.

“Children will start to be introduced gradually to issues around mental health, well-being and happiness right from the start of primary school,” he added.

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Arline Hygiene

Arline Hygiene

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How to Teach Frustration Tolerance to Kids

How to Teach Frustration Tolerance to Kids

Many young children struggle with frustration tolerance. Anger and frustration are powerful emotions, and children’s reactions can be intense in the moment. As adults, we know when our anger buttons are pushed. We know what we need to do to work through something frustrating in an appropriate manner. Kids, however, don’t enter this world with a pocket full of frustration management skills.

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Speaking a Second Language May Give Low-Income Kids a Boost

Speaking a Second Language May Give Low-Income Kids a Boost

In an analysis published online in January in Child Development, Singapore Management University researchers probed demographic data and intellectual assessments from a subset of more than 18,000 kindergartners and first graders in the U.S. As expected, they found children from families with low socioeconomic status (based on factors such as household income and parents' occupation and education level) scored lower on cognitive tests. But within this group, kids whose families spoke a second language at home scored better than monolinguals.

Evidence for a “bilingual advantage”—the idea that speaking more than one language improves mental skills such as attention control or ability to switch between tasks—has been mixed. Most studies have had only a few dozen participants from mid- to high-socioeconomic-status backgrounds perform laboratory-based tasks.

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